x i

Glasgow St Patricks Festival 2017

Written on January 14, 2017

Glasgow St Patricks Festival 2017

What is the Glasgow St Patricks Festival

 

The Glasgow St. Patrick’s festival esteems to promote and celebrate the rich Irish cultural heritage of Glasgow and Scotland. The multi-generational Irish community in Scotland have through the years contributed positively to all sectors of Scottish Society. The cultural dynamics of Gaelic music, language, dance and sport have enjoyed and continue to foster a rich Irish identity and culture in Scotland. The festival looks to act as a vehicle to continue to celebrate this Irish tapestry while promoting and celebrating the cultural diversity of modern Scotland. Glasgow’s St. Patrick’s festival is open to all the citizens of Scotland. We look forward to seeing you during the festival.
The Glasgow St. Patrick’s Festival is a non-profit organisation and all proceeds from the festival are reinvested equally in the continuation of the festival in future years, and to help fund the Emerald Lunch Club, a project operated in conjunction with the Irish Heritage Foundation, Conradh na Gaeilge & Comhaltas Ceoltóirí Éireann which provides afernoon lunch and entertainment for the elderly Irish (and wider) community throughout the year
We are indebted to our gernerous partners and sponsors who make it possible to host the festival. In particular we must thank the Irish Government Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade of Ireland for their grant through the IGESP scheme and Merchant City Properties – operators of Merchant Square in Glasgow for their generous use of facilities during the festival period. Please visit our sponsors page to find out more information.

 

There are several accounts of Saint Patrick’s death. One says that Patrick died at Saul, Downpatrick, Ireland, on March 17, 460 A.D. His jawbone was preserved in a silver shrine and was often requested in times of childbirth, epileptic fits, and as a preservative against the “evil eye.” Another account says that St. Patrick ended his days at Glastonbury, England and was buried there. The Chapel of St. Patrick still exists as part of Glastonbury Abbey. Today, many Catholic places of worship all around the world are named after St. Patrick, including cathedrals in New York and Dublin city. A toast for St Patrick’s Day, “May the roof above us never fall in, and may we friends beneath it never fall out.”Saint Patrick’s Day?
Saint Patrick’s Day has come to be associated with everything Irish: anything green and gold, shamrocks and luck. Most importantly, to those who celebrate its intended meaning, St. Patrick’s Day is a traditional day for spiritual renewal and offering prayers for missionaries worldwide. Why is it celebrated on March 17th? One theory is that that is the day that St. Patrick died. Since the holiday began in Ireland, it is believed that as the Irish spread out around the world, they took with them their history and celebrations. The biggest observance of all is, of course, in Ireland. With the exception of restaurants and pubs, almost all businesses close on March 17th. Being a religious holiday as well, many Irish attend mass, where March 17th is the traditional day for offering prayers for missionaries worldwide before the serious celebrating begins.
The most important element of Saint Patrick’s Day, after mass, is the Saint Patrick’s Day Parades. Over 300 Saint Patrick’s Day Parades around the world celebrate this famous Saint Patrick’s Day .
The beating heart of these Saint Patrick’s Day Parades are the Pipe Bands with their stirring music & powerful presence.