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Stamford St Patricks Day 2017

Written on January 27, 2017

Stamford St Patricks Day 2017

Join us Saturday March 4th for the 22nd Annual Stamford St. Patrick’s Day Parade
  Parade begins at 12:00 Noon!

Robert Emmett Callahan

Grand Marshal
2017 Stamford St Patrick’s Day Parade
Robert Emmett Callahan Bio
Robert Emmett Callahan was born in New Rochelle, New York. Bob’s great-grandfather, Felix Callahan, immigrated from Ireland and settled in Montreal, Canada. There he founded the Harp, a monthly magazine and the Montreal Sun, one of the first daily Catholic newspapers in North America. The family then migrated to Brooklyn, NY followed by a move to Eastchester, NY in 1939. Bob had one brother who passed in early 2016.
 
He and his wife of 57 years, Lucile Buckley Callahan, have lived in Stamford since their marriage in 1959, and raised their six children here. They also have eight grandchildren and 2 great grandchildren. Bob is a trustee at the Church of St. Cecilia on Newfield Avenue. 
 
Bob attended public schools in Eastchester, NY and graduated from the School of Visual Arts in Manhattan. He is a veteran of the Korean conflict where he served as a high speed radio operator with the 24th Infantry Division. His career has included art director for several advertising agencies, partner in the multidisciplinary design partnership Design Collaborative, and Bob is currently a self-employed graphic designer and watercolorist.
 
Bob has served on the Board of Directors for the Stamford Chamber of Commerce, the New England Lyric Operetta, the Stamford Symphony Orchestra and is currently a Board member of Curtain Call in Stamford. He has also performed in fourteen theatre productions at Curtain Call, including performing the role of Emile DeBecque in South Pacific, Sky Masterson in Guys and Dolls, and his most memorable role as Captain Jack Boyle in Seán O’Casey’s Juno and the Paycock, which was first staged at the Abbey Theatre in Dublin in 1924. 
Stamford St Patrick’s Parade
Stamford St Patrick’s Parade

Stamford St Patrick’s Parade

There are several accounts of Saint Patrick’s death. One says that Patrick died at Saul, Downpatrick, Ireland, on March 17, 460 A.D. His jawbone was preserved in a silver shrine and was often requested in times of childbirth, epileptic fits, and as a preservative against the “evil eye.” Another account says that St. Patrick ended his days at Glastonbury, England and was buried there. The Chapel of St. Patrick still exists as part of Glastonbury Abbey. Today, many Catholic places of worship all around the world are named after St. Patrick, including cathedrals in New York and Dublin city. A toast for St Patrick’s Day, “May the roof above us never fall in, and may we friends beneath it never fall out.”Saint Patrick’s Day?

Saint Patrick’s Day has come to be associated with everything Irish: anything green and gold, shamrocks and luck. Most importantly, to those who celebrate its intended meaning, St. Patrick’s Day is a traditional day for spiritual renewal and offering prayers for missionaries worldwide. Why is it celebrated on March 17th? One theory is that that is the day that St. Patrick died. Since the holiday began in Ireland, it is believed that as the Irish spread out around the world, they took with them their history and celebrations. The biggest observance of all is, of course, in Ireland. With the exception of restaurants and pubs, almost all businesses close on March 17th. Being a religious holiday as well, many Irish attend mass, where March 17th is the traditional day for offering prayers for missionaries worldwide before the serious celebrating begins.

The most important element of Saint Patrick’s Day, after mass, is the Saint Patrick’s Day Parades. Over 300 Saint Patrick’s Day Parades around the world celebrate this famous Saint Patrick’s Day .

The beating  heart of these Saint Patrick’s Day Parades are the Pipe Bands with their stirring music & powerful presence.